Rafa’s Tennis Racquet Heavier and More Powerful for the Australian Open

Written by Senior Tennis Editor Peter Gehr

 Rafa's Tennis Racquet Heavier and More Powerful for the Australian Open

Rafa's Tennis Racquet Heavier and More Powerful for the Australian Open Photo by J Servat

Rafa’s tennis racquet heavier and more powerful for the Australian Open. Nadal intends using a Babolat, which is his preference for most tournaments. Having grown up with this racquet has a lot to do with the fact that this is what he’s used to, and with his powerful arms and intention to win, the combination may just be what’s needed to claim victory.

This is not the only extra weight that the Spaniard is talking about in recent days, and a difference of opinion between the world No. 2 and Roger Federer has got the media excited.

Rafa’s Tennis Racquet Heavier and More Powerful for the Australian Open

Rafael Nadal is set to begin his Australian Open with a mended right shoulder, some rediscovered passion, and a slightly heavier racquet he hopes will add even more power to his game.

However, there is one thing the world No2 doesn’t have, and that is any desire, having agitated last year for a reduced off season, to be seen as the public face of a mooted player push for a greater percentage of Grand Slam takings and improved Davis Cup scheduling.

Reluctant to make any ”crazy changes”, Nadal said his heavier racquet will help him return high balls with more aggression.

”You cannot make crazy changes having two weeks of preparation to start another season. These are small changes. You cannot have drastic changes in nothing in your life. All the changes must be slow,” Nadal, who has had three grams added to the top of his racquet, said.

”It gives you a little bit more power. That’s all. It’s three more grams. Three more grams probably on the side of the racquet doesn’t feel for changes. But three more grams just on the top of the racquet makes a change.

”For a few balls, for the higher balls, you can hit the ball a little bit more flat because the racquet goes faster into the ball, the racquet goes quicker. The normal thing when you have a change like this is, you lose a little bit of control in the beginning but you win a bit more power at the beginning.

”I will tell you in a few months [if I am happy with it]. In theory, yes, I am. I am happy, no? I did that because we believe that can be a really positive thing to help me in a few aspects of my game. It’s working well in practice.”

The men’s champion will receive $2.3million at this year’s Open, from a prize pool of $26million, but it is the lower-ranked players that want their pay increased, with their higher-ranked counterparts concerned by how soon after major tournaments they are required for Davis Cup duty. Click here to visit the original source of this post

Rafa’s tennis racquet heavier and more powerful for the Australian Open. This is a slight adjustment for him to use that little extra weight to help him return a more aggressive ball to his rivals. With giant prize money for the winners, the incentive to seek out any tweak that may offer an edge is a worthwhile tennis strategy, and, besides, we’re only talking about 3 grams.

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